Blog

Roswell Park study finds e-cigarettes ‘safer, less toxic’ (Buffalo Business First, Aug. 2016)

Roswell Park study finds e-cigarettes ‘safer, less toxic’ (Buffalo Business First, Aug. 2016)

Written By: Tracey Drury

“While nicotine exposure remains the same, individuals who switch from tobacco cigarettes to e-cigarettes saw the levels of specific carcinogens and toxins reduced significantly. The study also found that switching did not cause study participants to crave higher levels of nicotine.

“They are safer, less toxic,” he said. “It’s the first time we have very strong evidence that we will be able now to give (smokers) that the answer is, yes , this you should consider a transition, a substitute for your tobacco cigarette that will save your life.”

Researchers focused on transitioning existing smokers to e-cigarettes, recruiting 20 individuals who reported smoking an average of 16 cigarettes per day and who had previously tried, unsuccessfully, to quit using different medicines and smoking cessation methods…

The study is believed to be the first on smokers to demonstrate that substituting e-cigarettes for tobacco cigarettes may reduce exposure to toxins and carcinogens that can cause cancer. That’s an important finding for a cancer institute that focuses on reducing exposure and causes of cancer, he said. Roswell Park also holds the contract to run New York’s statewide smoker’s quitline.”

The FDA’s Incomprehensible Answer To A Crucial Question About Its E-Cigarette Regulations

The FDA’s Incomprehensible Answer To A Crucial Question About Its E-Cigarette Regulations

8.1.16_smoke-nv-disposable-canadian

The Food and Drug Administration’s legal rationale for regulating e-cigarettes as “tobacco products,” even though they do not contain tobacco, is that they deliver nicotine derived from tobacco. But e-cigarettes do not always do that. There are many varieties of nicotine-free e-liquids, sold in disposable e-cigarettes, replaceable cartridges and bottles for refilling vaporizer tanks. Do those liquids and the systems in which they are used also qualify as tobacco products?

The answer to that question is vitally important for manufacturers, including vape stores that mix their own liquids, since it will determine which products are subject to theonerous, expensive FDA requirements that are expected to put all but the biggest e-cigarette companies out of business. But judging from correspondence that Boston University public health professor Michael Siegel postedtoday, the FDA is incapable of giving a succinct—or even comprehensible—answer to this basic question.

Siegel, who supports the use of e-cigarettes as a harm-reducing alternative to the conventional kind, says “someone” (presumably a business owner) shared with him the FDA’s response to this question: “Are e-cigs that do not contain nicotine (or any other tobacco extracts) also covered by the FDA deeming regulations? If so, will they also require pre-market approval like products that do contain nicotine?” The agency’s reply, which you can read in its entirety (if you dare) on Siegel’s tobacco policy blog, is more than 1,300 words long and consists mostly of irrelevant boilerplate…

 

READ MORE @: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacobsullum/2016/07/25/the-fdas-incomprehensible-answer-to-a-crucial-question-about-its-e-cigarette-regulations/#2db32c5b5b1b